Secret ICD 10 Code for Hypercalcemia

ICD 10 Code For Hypercalcemia

Hypercalcemia: Causes, Symptoms, and ICD-10 Code for Hypercalcemia

Explore the ICD 10 code for Hypercalcemia and gain insights on signs, symptoms, causes, and treatment options. Expand your knowledge here! Hypercalcemia is a condition where the level of calcium in the blood is abnormally high. It can cause various health problems and complications. We will provide the ICD-10 code for hypercalcemia, which is a code used to classify diseases and conditions for medical and billing purposes.

What is Hypercalcemia?

Hypercalcemia means having too much calcium in the blood. Calcium is a mineral that is essential for many bodily functions, such as bone health, muscle contraction, nerve transmission, and blood clotting. However, when the level of calcium in the blood is too high, it can interfere with these functions and cause damage to various organs and tissues.

The normal range of calcium in the blood is between 8.5 and 10.2 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL). Hypercalcemia is defined as having a calcium level above 10.5 mg/dL. Mild hypercalcemia may not cause any symptoms, but moderate to severe hypercalcemia can cause serious complications and even be life-threatening.

What is the ICD-10 Code for Hypercalcemia?

The ICD-10 code for hypercalcemia is E83.52. This code belongs to the category of disorders of mineral metabolism (E83), which includes conditions such as hypocalcemia, hyperphosphatemia, hypophosphatemia, and hypermagnesemia.

The ICD-10 code for hypercalcemia is a billable/specific code that can be used to indicate a diagnosis for reimbursement purposes. It is valid for the fiscal year 2023, which starts on October 1, 2022, and ends on September 30, 2023.

What Causes Hypercalcemia?

There are many possible causes of hypercalcemia, but the most common ones are:

  • Hyperparathyroidism: This is a condition where the parathyroid glands, which are four small glands located behind the thyroid gland in the neck, produce too much parathyroid hormone (PTH). PTH regulates the level of calcium in the blood by increasing its absorption from the intestines, decreasing its excretion by the kidneys, and releasing it from the bones. When there is too much PTH, the level of calcium in the blood rises.
  • Malignancy: This is a term for cancer or tumors that can affect various parts of the body. Some cancers can produce substances that mimic PTH or increase its activity, leading to hypercalcemia. Some cancers can also spread to the bones and cause them to release calcium into the blood. The most common types of cancer that can cause hypercalcemia are breast cancer, lung cancer, multiple myeloma, and lymphoma.
  • Vitamin D excess: Vitamin D is a vitamin that helps the body absorb calcium from food and supplements. However, when there is too much vitamin D in the body, either from excessive intake or from certain medical conditions (such as sarcoidosis or tuberculosis), it can cause hypercalcemia by increasing the absorption of calcium from the intestines and decreasing its excretion by the kidneys.
  • Familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia: This is a rare genetic disorder that causes hypercalcemia due to a defect in a protein called calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR). CaSR normally senses the level of calcium in the blood and regulates PTH secretion accordingly. However, when CaSR is defective, it does not respond to high levels of calcium and does not inhibit PTH secretion. As a result, PTH remains high and causes hypercalcemia.

Other less common causes of hypercalcemia include:

  • Thyrotoxicosis: This is a condition where the thyroid gland produces too much thyroid hormone, which can increase bone turnover and release calcium into the blood.
  • Adrenal insufficiency: This is a condition where the adrenal glands do not produce enough cortisol, which is a hormone that helps regulate calcium balance in the body.
  • Medications: Some medications can cause hypercalcemia by affecting calcium metabolism or excretion. Examples include thiazide diuretics (which decrease calcium excretion by the kidneys), lithium (which increases PTH secretion), vitamin A (which increases bone resorption), and antacids (which contain calcium).
  • Dehydration: Dehydration can cause hypercalcemia by reducing the volume of blood and increasing its concentration of calcium.

What are the Symptoms of Hypercalcemia?

The symptoms of hypercalcemia depend on its severity and duration. Mild hypercalcemia may not cause any noticeable symptoms, but moderate to severe hypercalcemia can cause:

  • Nervous system symptoms: These include confusion, lethargy, depression, memory loss, hallucinations, seizures, coma, and death.
  • Muscular system symptoms: These include muscle weakness, fatigue, cramps, spasms, and tetany (a condition where muscles contract involuntarily).
  • Digestive system symptoms: These include anorexia (loss of appetite), nausea, vomiting, constipation, abdominal pain, pancreatitis (inflammation of the pancreas), and peptic ulcers (sores in the stomach or duodenum).
  • Urinary system symptoms: These include polyuria (increased urine output), polydipsia (increased thirst), dehydration, kidney stones, and kidney failure.
  • Cardiovascular system symptoms: These include hypertension (high blood pressure), arrhythmias (irregular heartbeats), bradycardia (slow heart rate), and cardiac arrest.
  • Skeletal system symptoms: These include bone pain, fractures, osteoporosis (loss of bone density), and osteitis fibrosa cystica (a condition where bones become soft and develop cysts).

How is Hypercalcemia Diagnosed?

Hypercalcemia is diagnosed by measuring the level of calcium in the blood. A blood test called serum calcium test can measure the total amount of calcium in the blood, which includes both the free (ionized) and the bound (to proteins) forms of calcium. However, the free form of calcium is more biologically active and more relevant for diagnosis and treatment. Therefore, another blood test called the ionized calcium test can measure the level of free calcium in the blood, which is more accurate and reliable.

Other blood tests that can help diagnose hypercalcemia include:

  • Parathyroid hormone (PTH) test: This test measures the level of PTH in the blood, which can help determine if hypercalcemia is due to hyperparathyroidism or other causes. A high PTH level indicates hyperparathyroidism, while a low or normal PTH level indicates other causes.
  • Vitamin D test: This test measures the level of vitamin D in the blood, which can help determine if hypercalcemia is due to vitamin D excess or deficiency. A high vitamin D level indicates vitamin D excess, while a low vitamin D level indicates vitamin D deficiency.
  • Phosphate test: This test measures the level of phosphate in the blood, which can help determine if hypercalcemia is due to bone resorption or renal failure. A low phosphate level indicates bone resorption, while a high phosphate level indicates renal failure.
  • Magnesium test: This test measures the level of magnesium in the blood, which can help determine if hypercalcemia is due to magnesium deficiency or excess. A low magnesium level indicates magnesium deficiency, while a high magnesium level indicates magnesium excess.

Other tests that can help diagnose hypercalcemia include:

  • Electrocardiogram (ECG): This test records the electrical activity of the heart, which can show signs of arrhythmias or cardiac arrest caused by hypercalcemia.
  • Urinalysis: This test analyzes the urine for signs of dehydration, kidney stones, or kidney failure caused by hypercalcemia.
  • Bone density scan: This test uses X-rays to measure the density of bones, which can show signs of osteoporosis or fractures caused by hypercalcemia.
  • Bone biopsy: This test involves taking a small sample of bone tissue and examining it under a microscope, which can show signs of osteitis fibrosa cystica caused by hypercalcemia.

How is Hypercalcemia Treated?

The treatment of hypercalcemia depends on its cause, severity, and symptoms. The main goals of treatment are to lower the calcium level in the blood, treat the underlying cause, and prevent complications.

Some common treatments for hypercalcemia include:

  • Hydration: This involves giving fluids intravenously (through a vein) or orally (by mouth) to dilute the calcium in the blood and increase its excretion by the kidneys. Hydration also helps to prevent dehydration and kidney damage caused by hypercalcemia.
  • Diuretics: These are medications that increase urine output and decrease calcium reabsorption by the kidneys. Diuretics are usually given along with hydration to enhance their effect. The most commonly used diuretic for hypercalcemia is furosemide (Lasix).
  • Bisphosphonates: These are medications that inhibit bone resorption and lower calcium release from the bones. Bisphosphonates are usually given intravenously for rapid effect. The most commonly used bisphosphonates for hypercalcemia are pamidronate (Aredia) and zoledronic acid (Zometa).
  • Calcitonin: This is a hormone that lowers calcium levels by inhibiting bone resorption and increasing calcium excretion by the kidneys. Calcitonin is usually given as a nasal spray or an injection for short-term effects.
  • Glucocorticoids: These are medications that reduce inflammation and lower calcium levels by inhibiting vitamin D activity and increasing calcium excretion by the kidneys. Glucocorticoids are usually given orally or intravenously for moderate to severe hypercalcemia. The most commonly used glucocorticoid for hypercalcemia is prednisone.
  • Dialysis: This is a procedure that filters the blood through a machine that removes excess fluids and wastes, including calcium. Dialysis is usually reserved for severe hypercalcemia that does not respond to other treatments or causes kidney failure.

In addition to these treatments, the underlying cause of hypercalcemia should also be addressed. For example, if hypercalcemia is due to hyperparathyroidism, surgery to remove the overactive parathyroid glands may be performed. If hypercalcemia is due to malignancy, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, or surgery to treat the cancer may be performed. If hypercalcemia is due to vitamin D excess, vitamin D intake should be reduced or stopped.

How to Prevent Hypercalcemia?

Hypercalcemia can be prevented by maintaining a normal calcium balance in the body. Some preventive measures include:

  • Eating a balanced diet: A balanced diet that provides adequate amounts of calcium, vitamin D, and other nutrients can help regulate calcium metabolism and prevent deficiencies or excesses. Foods that are rich in calcium include dairy products, green leafy vegetables, nuts, seeds, and fortified cereals. Foods that are rich in vitamin D include fatty fish, egg yolks, cheese, and fortified milk. However, excessive intake of calcium or vitamin D supplements should be avoided unless prescribed by a doctor.
  • Drinking enough fluids: Drinking enough fluids can help prevent dehydration and keep the kidneys functioning properly. Fluids can also help dilute the calcium in the blood and increase its excretion by the kidneys. Water is the best fluid to drink, but other beverages such as juice, tea, coffee, and milk can also be consumed in moderation. Alcohol and caffeinated drinks should be limited or avoided as they can cause dehydration and increase calcium loss by the kidneys.
  • Exercising regularly: Exercising regularly can help strengthen the bones and prevent osteoporosis. Exercise can also help improve blood circulation and lower blood pressure. However, excessive exercise or physical activity should be avoided as they can cause dehydration and increase calcium loss by the sweat glands and muscles.
  • Monitoring calcium levels: Monitoring calcium levels can help detect hypercalcemia early and prevent complications. Calcium levels can be measured by a blood test called serum calcium test or ionized calcium test. Calcium levels should be checked regularly if one has a history of hypercalcemia or a condition that increases the risk of hypercalcemia, such as hyperparathyroidism, malignancy, vitamin D excess, or kidney failure.

Conclusion

Hypercalcemia is a condition where the level of calcium in the blood is abnormally high. It can cause various symptoms and complications depending on its severity and duration. Hypercalcemia can be diagnosed by measuring the level of calcium in the blood and other tests that can help determine its cause. Hypercalcemia can be treated by lowering the calcium level in the blood, treating the underlying cause, and preventing complications. Hypercalcemia can be prevented by maintaining a normal calcium balance in the body.

FAQs

What is hypercalcemia?
Hypercalcemia is a condition where the level of calcium in the blood is abnormally high.

What are the symptoms of hypercalcemia?
Hypercalcemia can cause symptoms such as fatigue, muscle weakness, depression, anorexia, nausea, constipation, confusion, seizures, arrhythmias, kidney stones, and bone pain.

What are the causes of hypercalcemia?
Hypercalcemia can be caused by hyperparathyroidism, malignancy, vitamin D excess, familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia, thyrotoxicosis, adrenal insufficiency, medications, or dehydration.

How is hypercalcemia diagnosed?
Hypercalcemia is diagnosed by measuring the level of calcium in the blood and other tests that can help determine its cause, such as parathyroid hormone test, vitamin D test, phosphate test, magnesium test, electrocardiogram, urinalysis, bone density scan, and bone biopsy.

How is hypercalcemia treated?
Hypercalcemia is treated by lowering the calcium level in the blood, treating the underlying cause, and preventing complications. Some common treatments include hydration, diuretics, bisphosphonates, calcitonin, glucocorticoids, and dialysis.

How can hypercalcemia be prevented?
Hypercalcemia can be prevented by maintaining a normal calcium balance in the body. Some preventive measures include eating a balanced diet, drinking enough fluids, exercising regularly, and monitoring calcium levels.

What is the ICD-10 code for hypercalcemia?
The ICD-10 code for hypercalcemia is E83.52. This code is used to classify hypercalcemia for medical and billing purposes. It is valid for the fiscal year 2023.

Secret ICD 10 Code for Hypercalcemia
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